WALKS OUTSIDE THE VILLAGE

Chobham is blessed with a great network of ancient footpaths and bridleways.   Three walks using these tracks are described below.   John Quarendon, in his book "I'll Drink to That!" (locally published by Jaykew) lists several circular pub walks through local history.  The book may still be available from the Chobham post office.

THREE WALKS FROM CHOBHAM

Among the many walks around Chobham, the three following are each different and special in their own way. They cover terrain as different as farmland, permanent pasture, river banks, heath and woods. Ordnance Survey Map SU96SE is recommended for route finding though walks are well signposted and many are way-marked with yellow flashes. As described, these three walks all start and finish at the car park behind the Cannon.

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Three Mile Walk

This follows the southern bank of the Mill Bourne through pleasant water meadows giving open views on all sides. Alder, blackthorn, broom and varied meadow flowers adorn the bank and lark, duck, pheasant and perhaps even a kingfisher may be seen. Emmetts Mill is an 18th century house standing where water mills have stood for 500 years. The path crosses rising pastures to emerge by the 17th century Sandpit Hall, and shortly leads north to rejoin the outward route.


Four Mile Walk

Northwards from the village the path leads to Little Heath Farm, a dignified 17th century dwelling, passes the fascinating and equally ancient Burr Hill Cottage where the highwayman Claud Dural is said to have lodged. From there a leafy track leads towards the southern edge of Chobham Common. Silver sandy tracks amid heather and shrubs give wide heathland views before reaching Burrow Hill. From Steep Hill grassy paths lead south giving glimpses of many handsome old houses, until the route leads back to the village by Pennypot Cottage.


Six Mile Walk

This walk continues along the bank of the Mill Bourne beyond Emmetts Mill before skirting Fairoaks Airfield to mount the wooded southern slope of Stanners Hill, passing two fine 17th century dwellings of very different appearance: Stanners Cottage and Stanners Hill Manor. By contrast the northern slope is open bracken and birch clad, and leads to low lying heathland concealing Fish Pool. Thence westward over farmland, past 18th century Chobham Park House which stands in fine isolation on the moated site of the ancient Manor of Chobham, and out onto Mincing Lane. Return along the outward path of the 'four mile walk', passing two 17th century houses - Little Heath Farm and Burr Hill Cottage.